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PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2007 10:29 pm 
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Burnley Express, 19th July 1916
YOUNG MANUFACTURER WOUNDED
News has been received that Pte. Fred Ashworth, son of Mr. Richard Ashworth of Albert-terrace Manchester-road and of the firm of Ashworth Bros. Ltd. Cotton manufacturers, Hapton, has been wounded.
Pte. Ashworth was in the machine gun section of the Burnley ‘Pals’ which battalion he joined on its formation. He was then only 19 and became of age while with the battalion in Egypt. Intimation has been received that he was wounded at the outset of the British offensive in France on July 1st and he is also said to be missing. Pte. Ashworth has another brother in the Navy. Every sympathy will be felt with Mr. Richard Ashworth in his anxiety. Mr. Ashworth senior, is well known in cotton circles for the responsible position he holds at Peel Mill (Mr. George Walmsley)

Burnley Expres, 28th April 1917
PRESUMED DEAD
YOUNG BURNLEY SOLDIERS FATE
Mr. R. Ashworth, Albert-terrace, Manchester-road, Burnley, has received official intimation of the presumed death of his son, Private Fred Ashworth, in France, on the 1st July last, on which date Private Ashworth was posted as missing.
He was in the machine gun section of the Burnley “Pals” which battalion he joined on its formation. He was the only 19, and became of age while with the battalion in Egypt. Intimation was received that he was wounded and missing at the outset of the British offensive in France on July 1st last year. Pte. Ashworth was a member of the firm of Ashworth Bros. Ltd., cotton manufacturers. Hapton. His brother, Harold Ashworth, is in the Navy.
http://burnleyinthegreatwar.info/burnle ... d15179.htm


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2007 10:36 pm 
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Burnley Express, 24th March 1915
AFTER 16 YEARS SERVICE
KILLED BY A SNIPER, NEWS OF A BURNLEY MAN
A letter home, sent by a Burnley soldier named Clarke, contains news of the death of his regimental chum, Pte. J.W. Asnip of 8 Lisbon-street, Burnley and says that he was killed by a German sniper.
Pte. Asnip had completed 16 years service in the Army and volunteered, and was accepted for service when the war commenced. He had a proud Army record.
When the Boer War broke out he was serving in India, where he had been seven years and he had earned a badge for a skirmish near Paard and along with his regiment the 2nd East Lancashires was sent to the front early on. He took part in the big engagements and at the end of the war, through which he passed without injury was given the King’s and Queen’s medals with three and two clasps respectively.
Returning from Africa, Asnip became employed as a pit top worker at Bank Hall and he was still employed there after 13 years continuous service when he left for France in August. He got to the firing line with the East Lancashires early in September and letters were received from him more or less regularly up to some five weeks ago when a photograph of his wife, which at his own request had been sent out to him, was returned with the information that the soldier could not be found. Nothing further was heard until Pte. Clarke’s message arrived on Sunday. The dead soldier was very well known in the Sandygate district, and was a general favourite with the workmen at Bank Hall.
It is interesting to note that three other members of the Asnip family have served in the colours, two in the East Lancashires and one in the Scottish Borderers.

http://burnleyinthegreatwar.info/burnle ... nw7164.htm


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 06, 2007 10:11 am 
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Burnley Express, 15 May 1915

REPORTED KILLED SOLDIER WITH SEVEN YEARS SERVICE
From a letter received in Burnley this week it would appear the Lce. Corpl. James Catlow, who resides in Cog Lane, Burnley, has been killed in action, but as his mother has received no definite information she is still hoping that the report may not be true. The soldier was engaged to be married.
Lce. Corpl. Catlow was working at Barden Pit as a collier when he was called as a reservist, and previously he had served seven years with the colours, four of which were spent in India, one in South Africa, and two at Curragh Camp in Ireland. He celebrated his 29th birthday on the battlefield, and before and since had many narrow escapes from death.
Mrs. Catlow has two other sons in the Army, Ptes. Edward and Willie, and one of them has been wounded in action. Definite news as to the son reported killed will be eagerly awaited by her.


Burnley Express, 12 June 1915

"IF THE PUBLIC ONLY NEW"
DEAD BURNLEY SOLDER'S
APPEAL
Reported as being killed in action early in May, and announced in the "Express" as such, definite news has not reached Mrs. Catlow, who resides at 123 Cog Lane, Burnley, as to the fate of her son James.

A private in the East Lancashire reserve, and called on at the beginning of August last, Catlow was promoted to the rank of lance-corporal on arriving in France, and the advance was fully deserved, the soldier having served nine years in the Army, four of which were spent in India, one in South Africa, and two at the Curragh Camp in Ireland. He celebrated his 29th birthday on the battlefield.

The soldier was engaged to be married, and his young lady and his mother had received indirect information of his death, but all doubts were set at rest by the arrival of the War Office intimation on Monday, that date of death being given as May 9th. Writing to his sweetheart two days previously - May 7th - the lance-corporal said:
"You will have seen in the papers that the Germans have been using gas. Well, they have not gassed me yet. We have all had issued out to us respirators, and when we get into the trenches to-night we shall be wearing them. I cannot tell you when I shall be able to write again, as we don't know how long we are going in for. There has been some fierce fighting of late on both sides, and many casualties. The public never get the truth in the papers, for I am sure that if they did they would not have to beg for recruits as they are doing. In my opinion, though, this war will never end by fighting; money will tell in the end."

Quite a short time before he was killed Lce.-Corpl. Catlow sent home a beautiful link of rosary beads and number of coins as mementoes of the war. He was well known in the Cog Lane district, and the sympathy of all who knew him will be extended to his relatives and fiancé. One of the soldier's brothers, Pte. Wm. Catlow, is in Glasgow Hospital, with shrapnel wounds in the leg.

http://www.burnleyinthegreatwar.info/bu ... es8778.htm


Last edited by Leaver on Thu Sep 06, 2007 10:13 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 06, 2007 10:12 am 
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Burnley Express, 18 August 1916

TWO SONS KILLED

Mrs. Catlow, 81 Cog Street, Burnley, was last week informed that her youngest son, Pte. Edward, East Lancashire Regt. died from wounds at a casualty clearing station on August 2nd. He was only 21 years of age. Formerly he was employed at Bank Hall Pit. Pte. Catlow had been three times in hospital, ont he first occasion from shell shock, then from malaria fever, and lastly from injuries sustained as the result of being buried by a shell. At home he was a member of the Myrtle Bank Sunday School football team. He was very popular in the Cog Lane district.

He is the second son Mrs. Catlow has lost in the war. Lance.Corpl. James Catlow, East Lancashire Regt. aged 29, was called up as a reservist on the outbreak of war, and fell in action on May 9th 1915. Of the three remaining sons, one was a reservist whose time expired while he was on services during the war. He was wounded on the same day that his brother James was killed.

http://www.burnleyinthegreatwar.info/bu ... d18574.htm


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 Post subject: SERGEANT JOHN BANNISTER
PostPosted: Sun Oct 14, 2007 12:22 am 
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BURNLEY COUNCILLOR
DEATH OF SERGEANT JOHN BANNISTER
Victim of Typhus at Alexandria (Burnley News 27/6/1917)

Burnley has lost a good citizen by the death of Councillor John Bannister. The news, which came by wire on Monday night to the Mayor, was despatched from Alexandria at 1 p.m. it briefly stated that Sergt. Bannister was dead, and added “Please convey deepest sympathy of our staff here to family.”
As we stated on Saturday, a telegraphic message in the early part of last week announced that the soldier-councillor was dangerously ill. It later transpired that he was suffering from that dread malady, typhus. A message from Alexandria on Friday stated that he was in a dangerous condition, but was holding his own.
Councillor Bannister enlisted in the Expeditionary Force Canteens, A.S.C., last year. On Burnley Fair Monday he left England for the Eastern zone of operations. When the fact that he had joined the Colours was announced at a Council meeting it was met with a chorus of approval. During his connection with the Army he proved himself an efficient soldier, just as previously he had demonstrated efficiency as a townsman. His death at the early age of 39 will be deeply regretted.
Councillor Bannister was a Conservative, and in that interest he represented Gannow Ward. He was elected in November, 1911, in a three-cornered fight, the figures being :- John Bannister C, 695: J.H. Howarth L, 418; L Rippon Soc., 588. He has represented the ward ever since, there having been no contenders since the outbreak of war. He was a useful type of Councillor, and won the respect of his colleagues. On the resignation of Alderman Hough, he became Chairman of the Markets Committee. Latterly he also served on the Town Hall. Baths and Cemetery, the Electricity, and the Gas Sub-Committees, and also, of course, on the General Purposes Committee, which comprised of the entire Council.
He was the fourth son of the late Mr. John Bannister, Accrington-road. In business he was a grocer and off-licence holder in Accrington-road. He was a member of the Off Licence Holders Association and of the Junior Unionist Association. He was connected with Holy Trinity Church. His youngest brother, Sapper William Bannister is serving with the Royal Engineers. Councillor Bannister married Miss Pomfret, daughter of the late Mr. Pomfret, butcher, Padiham-road. He leaves a widow, two daughters, and one son. One of the daughters recently obtained a scholarship to the Burnley High School, coming out third in the examination.
Yesterday the flag at the Town Hall was floated half mast.

http://burnleyinthegreatwar.info/burnle ... 198985.htm


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2007 3:09 pm 
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Private Richard Leaver
201935 1/5th Kings Own Royal Lancaster Regiment
Missing in Action 31st July 1917, aged 41
Buried in Vlamertinghe New Military Cemetery, Belgium

Burnley Express, 11 August 1917

WELL-KNOWN WORSTHORNE MAN.
News reached Worsthorne on Thursday morning that Pte. Richard Leaver, of the King’s Own Royal Lancaster Regt., had been killed whilst waiting orders to go over the top. This sad news was conveyed to his wife in a very sympathetic letter received from the deceased soldier’s officer, who was himself wounded soon after.
Pte. Leaver was a native of Worsthorne, and was one of the best known men in the rural district. He was an excellent vocalist, and a keen cricketer and footballer, being a member of Worstorne St. John’s cricket team when they were in the Ribblesdale Junior League. He was a bright, genial character, full of good humour, and an excellent raconteur. For many years he was an official of the Worsthorne Agricultural Society, and a chorister at St. John’s Church. He was also a member of the Worsthorne Pierrot Troupe, and freely gave his services on any good cause.
The deceased, who will be much missed in the village, was in his 42nd year, and leaves a widow and four young children, for whom the greatest sympathy is felt. Pte. Leaver was uncle to Lieut. Gray Leaver, of the Burnley Recruiting Office, and also to Lieut. Harry Gray Leaver, of the Lancashire Fusiliers, who has been wounded in France. Pte. Leaver, who only went to France in March, was one of the first to attest in Worsthorne, and enlisted voluntarily last December. He was employed on the motor of Messrs. J. R. Greenwood and Co., Ltd., Worsthorne, and his employers had an appeal in for him.
The following letter has been received, dated August 5, from Second-Lieut. Mackey by Mrs. Leaver: - “Dear madam. – I am taking this opportunity to express the deep sorrow of myself and each man of No. 9 Platoon at the loss of such an excellent soldier and man as your husband. His death was instantaneous, as a shell fell in the bay in which he was sitting, and I myself had just been speaking to him and the other poor boys who were with him only two minutes before. This occurred only an hour or two before we went over the top, and your husband was to act as my runner in the operation. Although he was only a few months with us, his excellent work and continuous good humour had already impressed me so much that I had suggested his name for promotion, which he undoubtedly would very soon have obtained. I myself was wounded in the arm just after reaching our objective, about half an hour after going over, so I trust you will accept this excuse for not writing soon. He had often been on dangerous work with me, and at all times showed the greatest courage, and inspired good work out of every person around him. His loss to me is a personal one for he was continually with me, and I regarded him as a friend as well as one of my platoon. Captain Briggs (our company commander) and all C-Company and myself again wish to express our deepest sympathy in your great loss.”

http://burnleyinthegreatwar.info/burnle ... 201935.htm


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 26, 2007 8:44 pm 
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Burnley Express and Advertiser, June 5th, 1926

NEIGHBOURS BLOWS.
“LET CHILDREN FIGHT THEIR OWN BATTLES.”

A fine of 10s., including costs, was imposed at Burnley Police Court, on Wednesday, on Charles Cawtherley, collier, 96 Hufling-lane, who was found guilty of assaulting Michael Gallagher, his next door neighbour.
Complainant, who resides at 100, Hufling-lane, stated that on May 25th there was trouble between his and defendants children, and defendant’s wife started making a row. Complainant went to the door and said something to her, and then returned into the house. Shortly afterwards defendant came into the house and, without saying a word, struck witness in the face with his fist.
By defendant: He denied hitting him in the mouth.
Defendant said he was in his house, when he heard complainant say to his (defendants) wife, “I will hit you in the mouth.” He thereupon went close to complainant’s doorway, and complainant hit him in the mouth, knocking two teeth out. They both closed, and witness retaliated.
In passing sentences, the Mayor advised defendant that whatever differences arose he had no right to go into another person’s house. No doubt he received provocation, but a person’s house was his private place. They should leave the children to fight their own battles.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 27, 2007 12:15 pm 
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Burnley Express 14/7/1915

BURNLEY DRIVER KILLED.
ARMY SERVICE CORPS MAN

Called up as a reservist in August last, and having been at the front from the commencement of the war, the death has taken place somewhere in Belgium on the 17th June of Driver John Catlow, of the Army Service Corps, whose home was at 6, Roebuck-street, Burnley. Driver Catlow was an only son, his parents residing at 40, Shale-street, and when he left to join his headquarters his only child was just one week old.
The soldier wrote regularly up to about June 14th- three days before his death: -“It would be a bit more comfortable if they fought with bladders and sticks instead of flinging lumps of iron at one another. The Germans started shelling just below our camp one night and struck the spire of a church, which caught fire. It looks a pity to see such fine buildings in ruins. If they go on much longer like they are doing there will be nothing left of Belgium, only bricks and mortar.”
Driver Catlow was a weaver at Messrs. Parkinson & Lupton’s Calder Vale Mill, and was 27 years of age.


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 Post subject: images of Burnley
PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2007 11:04 am 
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It is very sad to see these images of Burnley.

Most of these photos appear to be Duke Bar (BURNLEY - A DESPERATE RIOTS TORN PLACE)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yt6h2cvs ... re=related

This is Bank Hall Pit (BURNLEY - A DESPERATE RIOT TORN PLACE IN A WINTER WONDERLAND)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dIPLscyT ... re=related

Burnley Riot –Part 1 – Arial view of Yorkshire Street
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_b0_UFrAEII


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 10, 2007 5:51 pm 
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Burnley Advertiser, 14 January 1865

Martha Stowell, wife of William Stowell of the Sun Inn tap was charged with stealing nineteen sovereigns, and about sixteen shillings in silver, the property of John Thornber of Hellifield near Skipton, Yorkshire on Wednesday the 4 inst. The sovereigns were in a purse and the silver loose in the pocket of the prosecutor. It appeared that on the day named, the prosecutor was with the prisoner at the Masons' Arms tap. He fell asleep and the prisoner took the money from him in that state, and in the presence of the wife of the keeper of the tap, who remonstrated with her for taking it, and told her she did not allow such work there, there would be something done about it. When the prosecutor awoke, he felt his pockets and, finding his money gone, he asked about it of a man who was in the tap. He said he know nothing at all about it and called for the landlady to come in. The prosecutor then asked her about the loss of his money and she told him she knew all about it, the Mrs at the Sun tap had taken it. They then went down to the Sun Inn tap, and prosecutor asked the prisoner for his money. On her refusing to give it him...Committed for trial at the next sessions, bail was accepted.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2008 9:54 pm 
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ONE OF THREE BROTHERS KILLED (Burnley Express and Advertiser 29th April 1916)

Mr. And Mrs. Bowes, of 1 Lubbock-st., off Woodbine-road, Gannow, have received the sad news this week that one of their three soldier sons was killed in action on the 7th April. Pte. Edward Bowes enlisted in the East Lancashires (Kitcheners Army) in the first month of the war. He went out with the Mediterranean force, and was wounded in the Dardanelles. He was sent home and on his recovery he was drafted out again. Before the war he worked as a weaver at Waltons Mill. Pte. Bowes was only 21 years of age. There are two other brothers out at the front. Mr. Bowes, the father, who is employed at the loom works of Messrs. Butterworth and Dickinson, Rosegrove, has only three sons, and all have been fighting for their King and Country.



ONE OF THREE BROTHERS KILLED (Burnley Express and Advertiser 3rd May 1916)

As we announced on Saturday, Mr. and Mrs. Bowes, of 1 Lubbock-street, off Woodbine-road, Burnley, have received an intimation of the death from wounds, on the 7th of April, of their second son, Pte. Edward Bowes, of the East Lancashire Regt., who lost his life while gallantly serving his King and country in the Eastern theatre of war. Pte. Edward Bowes, who only recently reached his 22nd birthday, enlisted on the 10th of August 1914 a few days after war was declared. He was drafted out to the Dardanelles, and was wounded in the heavy fighting there last July. He was sent home, and about the end of November he sailed from Plymouth to rejoin his regiment in the Mediterranean. Prior to the war he was employed for several years as a weaver at Walton’s Woodbine Mill, and then shortly before he enlisted he went to work at Lane Head. His father is employed at the loom works of Messrs. Butterworth and Dickinson, Rosegrove. There are two other sons at the front – Pte. Willie Bowes, East Lancashires, and Driver Herbert Sutcliffe Bowes, of the County Palatine Artillery.




THREE FIGHTING BROTHERS
ANOTHERS FATE UNCERTAIN (Burnley Express and Advertiser 6th May 1916)

On Wednesday we gave a portrait and particulars of the death of Pte. Edward Bowes, of the East Lancashire Regt., son of Mr. and Mrs. Bowes of 1 Lubbock-street, Woodbine-road. Pte Edward Bowes, who was 22 years of age and who died from wounds, has two other brothers serving at the front.
Pte. Willie Bowes (whose portrait we give), aged 20 was in the same regiment as Edward, and they had been together in the Dardanelles, and latterly in another theatre of war. Pte. Willie is a signaller. His parents are getting rather uneasy about his fate, as they have heard nothing from him since the 13th of February. Prior to that they heard regularly from him, as well as his brothers. The third brother now at the front is. Driver Herbert Sutcliffe Bowes, aged 26, who is in the Howitzer Brigade, and who went out early last winter. Mr. and Mrs. Bowes have only these three sons, and all have been manfully doing their duty in the present war.


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 6:15 pm 
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Leaver wrote:
Burnley Express -- 14 July 1915
KILLED IN A TRENCH.
Death of a "Good Soldier"
On the eve of coming home for four days leave, Pte, James McCarthy, of the 1st East Lancashire Regiment of 51, Leyland Road, Burnley, has been killed in action somewhere on the Western front. The news was conveyed to his mother by Sergt. F.C. Scott, another Burnley man on Saturday morning. The sergeant wrote - "Dear Mrs. McCarthy, - I am sorry to inform you that your son, James (No. 6184 Pte. J. McCarthy), was killed yesterday morning, Tuesday, 6th July. You have no idea how sorry I am as he was such a good man for doing his duty and work, etc. I was holding a trench with - men, and there was a very heavy bombardment all day yesterday. Two shells dropped into the trench and killed eight men of my platoon. James was amongst them. Most of them were old hands and had done duty here since the start and they will be a great loss to me. But James will be a greater loss to you and also his poor wife. I called on his wife while I was on leave last February. Unfortunately, she was not at home, but I am living in hope to come out a visit if it is my luck to pull through all right.
I don't know the number of his wife's house so kindly break the news to her. You will hear from the War Office, but it may be a week or two. Please except my greatest sympathy to his wife. The remainder of the men in the Platoon wish to send their sympathy to you both. P.S -
When they were burying James this morning they found his wife's photo etc."
Pte. McCarthy who was 33 years of age, was a reservist, having been with the colours for seven years. He went through the South African War, and held the King and Queen's medals. His wife is left with three little children - a girl aged four, a boy aged three, and a little boy born after the father's departure to the western front and which the father never saw. The photo found on the dead soldier was that of his wife and three children. Before being called up Pte. McCarthy worked at Messrs. Cooper Bros. Foundry. Three of his brothers are in the Army, one of them Sergt. M. McCarthy, of the East Lancashire Regiment, having been wounded. The others Ptes. John and Thomas McCarthy, are in East Lancashire Battalions.
Only on Wednesday last week Pte. McCarthy's wife received a letter from him saying he was expecting to be home on leave in a few days, and promising to give her a good time when he came.

Burnley Express and Advertiser - September 11, 1915
Lost an eye. Burnley Soldiers Injury.
Pte. John McCarthy, of the 6th Batt. East Lancashire Regiment, whose home is at 29 Bedford Street, Burnley, has lost an eye as the result of a wound received at the Dardanelles. Writing to his wife, he said; -- "I got the bullet in the left eye, and it came out at the cheek. I am very lucky to be living. I am all right in myself and feel very well indeed. We get well looked after, and have had very good food. We were just coming out of the trenches to be relieved when I got hit, and I thought it was all over."
Pte. McCarthy was taken to a hospital at Port Said, and then sent to this country, now being at Brockenhurst, Hants. In a letter from the latter place he says; -- "My wound has healed up wonderfully. You can hardly see a mark on me, except my eye, which has vanished."
One of his brothers, Pte. James McCarthy, of the 1st East Lancashire Regiment has been killed in action, and another Sergt. M. McCarthy also of the East Lancashire has been wounded. Another brother, Thomas, is serving with the 6th Batt. East Lancashire Regiment at the Dardanelles.

Burnley Express - 5 February 1916
News Wanted - Young Burnley Soldier Missing
Mrs. McCarthy, of 11, Leyland road, Burnley, is desirous of obtaining definite news of her youngest son, Pte. Thomas McCarthy, of the 6th Batt. East Lancashire Regiment, who has been missing since August 9th. Pte. McCarthy, who is 23 years of age, was formerly employed at Towneley Colliery. His brother, Pte. James McCarthy, of the 1st East Lancashire Regt., was killed on July 6th, while another brother, Pte. John McCarthy, also of the 6th Batt., has lost an eye in action, and is still in hospital. Sergt. M. McCarthy, another brother, has also been wounded, but has recovered, and is now at Salenika.
Mrs. McCarthy has received the following letter from Lieut. Hugh Kelly; -- "I have made every effort in my power to trace your beloved son. I found out from Sergt. Taylor, of the machine gun section, that he was wounded in the head and also in the body, and he wandered off towards the dressing station a long way behind us. God in Heaven only knows what became of him afterwards. I hope you will put your trust in God, and hope for the best. If I ever find out any news of him I will let you know at once, as I thought a great deal of your son. Give my best wishes to your other boys."

Express and Advertiser, March 14, 1917 (page 3)
Now Presumed Dead. Missing in Eastern Campaign.
On Saturday Mrs. McCarthy, of 11, Leyland road, Burnley, received a communication from the War Office, stating that her youngest son, Pte. Thomas McCarthy, of the 6th East Lancashire Regiment who was reported missing in the East since August 9th, 1915, is now presumed to have been killed on that date.
Pte. McCarthy, who was 23 years of age, was formerly employed at Towneley Colliery. His brother Pte. James McCarthy, of the 1st East Lancashire Regt. was killed on July 6th, while another brother, Pte. John McCarthy, also of the 6th Batt., has lost an eye in action. Sergt. M. McCarthy, another brother has also been wounded. At the time Thomas was reported missing, Mrs. McCarthy received the following letter from Lieut. Hugh Kelly; -- "I have made every effort in my power to trace your beloved son. I found out from Sergt. Taylor, of the machine gun section, that he was wounded in the head and also in the body, and he wandered off towards the dressing station a long way behind us. God in Heaven only knows what became of him afterwards. I hope you will put your trust in God, and hope for the best. If I ever find out any news of him I will let you know at once, as I thought a great deal of your son. Give my best wishes to your other lads."

Express and Advertiser, March 17, 1917 (page 9)
Family That Has Been Hard Hit. -- Two Brothers Killed, Two Wounded, Cousin Missing.
A family very hard hit by the war is that of the McCarthy's, one of whom as announced Wednesday's issue, has now been presumed dead, after being missing at the Dardanelles from August 9, 1915. It is a remarkable record of four brothers and a cousin. All were in the East Lancashire Regt. Two brothers have now been killed; one has lost his left eye but is still serving; whilst the cousin, Pte. Lavin, has been reported wounded and missing since July 1st last, and there are no hopes that he is alive, as nothing has been heard of him, either officially or otherwise since. The unmarried McCarthy brothers lived at 11, Leyland Road, and the cousin (the only cousin) resided with his widowed mother in Pitt Street. Two of the brothers, John and Thomas, and the cousin enlisted within three days of each other.
The eldest of the McCarthy brothers is Sergt. Michael, who is forty years of age. He served in the Boer War, and was a reservist when the present war began with the 3rd East Lancashire Regt. He was on going out attached to another battalion, and has been wounded twice -- once at Neuve Chapelle and once at Salonika. He has now been in hospital at Salonika for the past eight months. He is unmarried.
Denis McCarthy, the second brother, has been rejected for military service, but he is working munitions.
The third, Pte. James McCarthy, who was 33 years old at the time he was killed, was with the 1st East Lancashire Regiment, and previous to joining the Army worked at Cooper's Foundry. He was married. He was killed at Ypres on July 6th 1915. He was a reservist having been with the colours seven years. He went through the Boer War. He left three little children, and on his dead body was found a photograph of his wife and children.
John McCarthy, the fourth son who is 32 and married, and belongs to the 6th East Lancashire Regiment lost his left eye through a bullet wound received at the Dardanelles. He was just coming out of the trenches when he was hit. He was taken to a hospital at Port Said, and afterwards came to a hospital at Brockenhurst, Hants. Pte. John McCarthy is still serving, being at the headquarters at Plymouth. He was formerly a joiner's labourer.
The fifth brother, Thomas is now presumed to have been killed after being missing at the Dardanelles since August 9th 1915. He was 23 years of age then, and previously was employed at Rowley Colliery. At the time he was missing a comrade said he was wounded in the head and body, and then disappeared.
Their cousin Pte. John Lavin, also of the East Lancashire Regiment was wounded and has been missing since July 1st. It is feared that he is dead.
The McCarthy family are connected with St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church.

Burnley Express August 1917
AFTER THIRTEEN MONTHS.
Mrs. Lavin, of 5, Pitt-street, Burnley has received a message from the War Office regretfully presuming the death of her only son, Pte. (16985) John Lavin, who was in the 7th East Lancashire Regt., no news having been heard of him since he went into action at the Somme on July 21, 1916. The soldier, who was aged 30 years and single, served in the Boer War with the Manchester Regt., and he enlisted voluntarily on November 5, 1914, in one of the Kitchener battalions, going to France in 1915. He worked as a labourer for the tramway department, and attended St. Mary's R.C. Church and School. Two cousins Pte. James McCarthy and Pte. Thos. McCarthy, were killed on July 6, 1915, at Ypres, and August 9, 1915, at the Dardanelles, and two other cousins, brothers of the McCarthy's killed have been wounded, the four brothers, by coincidence, all being in the East Lancashire Regt.
The soldiers father who lives in Healey Wood, was very much upset when he heard of the official news of his sons death.



Thanks to Maureen for finding this article.

Burnley Express – date unknown, circa. 1915

PICKED UP ON BATTLEFIELD
PHOTOGRAPHS BELONGING TO EAST LANCASHIRE MEN
BURNLEY SOLDIER'S FIND
These photographs, along with four others, have been sent to his wife at 51 Leyland Road, Burnley by Private J McCarthy (6184) of the 1st East Lancashire Regiment. In an accompanying letter to his wife he says: - "I am sending you these photographs, which I have found. I have been all round our regiment, and cannot find an owner. I think they are Burnley people, and you might know some of them." Mrs. McCarthy will be glad to give the photographs to claimants. At the back of the one of the four men is the following: "Dear Fred, - I have sent on Harry's photo. They are taken in their working clothes. Molly and Albert have gone out for a walk. - Rose." The message on the other photograph is "Dear Fred - just a few things from Bird." Pte McCarthy went to the front as a reservist with the first draft of East Lancashire’s. He had served seven years with the colours, four on the reserve and two under section D. Three of his brothers are also in the Army, and one of them, Sergt M McCarthy, is at present home wounded. The photographs were received by Mrs McCarthy on Sunday.

More info on Pte. James McCarthy

http://www.burnleyinthegreatwar.info/bu ... es6184.htm


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 16, 2008 2:40 pm 
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Burnley Express, 29th August 1934
FOR BURNLEY STUDENTS.
ELECTRICAL ENGINEER’S CERTIFICATES.
National Certificates of the Institution of Electrical Engineers, in conjunction with the Board of Education, have been awarded to the following students of the Burnley Municipal College:-
Ordinary Certificates: Harold Barrett, Herbert Fitzpatrick, Frank Johnston, Thomas D. Martin (mathematics electro-technics D.C.), Fred Nutter, Norman Shackleton.
Higher certificates: Percy Bowles (mechanical engineering for electrical engineers), Harold Leaver, Thomas Pickles (transmission and distribution of electrical energy, mechanical engineering for electrical engineer), Edward Pilling.


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Express and Advertiser, December 6, 1905
BRIERCLIFFE.
LANTERN LECTURE.- In connection with the Hill Lane Temperante Society a lecture illustrated by the lantern, was given in the schoolroom on Monday by Mr. Snowden of Burnley, the subject being “Child life in Burnley.” The Rev. A. Gray presided


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 29, 2008 12:28 pm 
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Express and Advertiser, December 16, 1905
BURNLEY DOCTOR IN A SMASH.
RUNAWAY HORSE COLLIDES WITH MOTORCAR.
An alarming accident occurred on Thursday morning, in Colne road, whereby Dr. T. Holt, of Colne road, was injured, but fortunately, not seriously. Shortly after half-past eleven a horse attached to a lurry, owned by Joseph Bradshaw, carting contractor, of New Hall street, and driven by Thomas Bartley, of 25 Milner street, was standing in the Marles street Shed yard when the animal took fright. It bolted along Marles street into Colne road, where it crashed into a motor car, owned and driven by Dr. Holt, who was accompanied by his dispenser, Mr. Thomas Hartley. As a result the front part of the car was badly damaged, and Dr. Holt was slightly injured on the right forefinger and thigh. Mr. Hartley escaped without injury. The horses career was not stopped by the motor-car, for it continued along Colne-road and only stopped in front of a tram car. The shafts of the lurry were broken, but the horse escaped uninjured.


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